Rhymes with Foyer

Calgary interior designer Reena Sotropa of Calgary interior design firm, Corea Sotropa Interior Design.

As a busy interior designer, you’d think that I would get my fill of room make-overs and renovations during my workday. Some days this is the case, but more often than not, after a long day at my pink lacquered desk here at the Corea Sotropa Interior Design  headquarters, you will find me curled up in front of the television tuned in to the HGTV network. I call it research, but I must admit, the lines between research and mindless entertainment are often a bit blurry.

I was conducting some high level “research” the other day while watching an American-based real estate program. The agent was touring her clients through three prospective dream homes and I kept hearing one word over and over like nails on a chalkboard: “Foyer.”

Superstock foyer image, as referenced in Calgary interior design blog, The Pink Chandelier, by Calgary interior designer Reena Sotropa of Corea Sotropa Interior Design.Congratulations, you just bought yourself one heck of a FoyER!  Image via Superstock.

Now I must clarify, it is not the word I have a problem with. Rather, it is the pronunciation that this Texan real estate agent was using. ‘Let’s step into the Foy-ER.’ ‘Look at the beautiful marble floors in this Foy-ER.’  It got me thinking, ‘How did this perfectly lovely word become defiled like this?’ Merriam Webster defines “foyer” as an anteroom, vestibule (especially of a theatre) or an entry hall. Please forgive my inelegance here, but this particular Texan’s pronunciation, with the gratingly hard R, sounded more like the definition of a back entry to me! I did a little research and found a great little website, called Phrontistery, that explores such issues. For those of you who are interested, read on. For those of you who are here for the pictures, I totally understand and encourage you to scroll on south!

According to the writer Forthright (on the Phrontistery website), the pronunciation FOY-er is more common in standard American English while FOY-yay is standard in British English. While some Australians pronounce the word FOY-er, Canadians and Brits do not. “Foyer” entered the English language only in 1859 through French, which was influential to the English elite at the time. The original French pronunciation (fwa-yay) is uncommon but, the current pronunciation (FOY-yay) is similar, at least in the second syllable. According again to Forthright, “Foyer” is experiencing a phonetic shift and because it is incomplete, the common pronunciation FOY-yay has no full rhymes in English. Well, add that to the list, right under the word orange!

Blogspot orange foyer image, as referenced in Calgary interior design blog, The Pink Chandelier, by Calgary interior designer Reena Sotropa of Corea Sotropa Interior Design.An Orange Foyer (I betcha can’t find something that rhymes with that!) by Martha Stewart

OK, now that I got THAT out of my system, I thought I might share with you how my own foyer came to be.  As I have mentioned in previous posts, I live in a pretty typical mid-century built bungalow. When we bought the house, the front entrance was a glorified hallway that opened onto the living room.

Corea Sotropa before foyer photo, as referenced in Calgary interior design blog, The Pink Chandelier, by Calgary interior designer Reena Sotropa of Corea Sotropa Interior Design.Before photo of the Sotropa residence. 

The above photo shows a view from the front door toward the kitchen. What is with the kitchen door?

Corea Sotropa before foyer photo, as referenced in Calgary interior design blog, The Pink Chandelier, by Calgary interior designer Reena Sotropa of Corea Sotropa Interior Design.Before photo of the Sotropa residence.

This photo shows a view toward the bathroom. Notice the lovely framed-out telephone niche on the right. You just don’t see details like that anymore!

Before photo of Sotropa residence. Photo property of Reena Sotropa.Before photo of the Sotropa residence

This photo above shows the view toward the master bedroom. For some reason the linen closet was built right over an existing sidelight. Weird!

Sotropa residence floorplans, as referenced in Calgary interior design blog, The Pink Chandelier, by Calgary interior designer Reena Sotropa of Corea Sotropa Interior Design.Before & After Floorplans of the Sotropa Foyer

As you can see from the above plans, we blew out the closets which divided the space into a series of hallways to create one room. I stole space for a new coat closet and linen closet from the small adjacent bedroom.

I enjoyed my research for this post so much! I just love looking at all the photos of bright beautiful foyers with 10-foot ceilings, pristine white paneling, graciously-paneled staircases and sunlight streaming in through leaded glass windows. That would be my go-to move if I were designing my dream foyer.

House Beautiful foyer image, as referenced in Calgary interior design blog, The Pink Chandelier, by Calgary interior designer Reena Sotropa of Corea Sotropa Interior Design.(Sigh…)  Image courtesy of House Beautiful Interior Design by Albert Hadley

Sadly, none of these elements can be used to describe my foyer with its 8-foot ceilings and shadowy light fighting to gain entrance through 2 skinny sidelights. I am nothing if not a design realist, and subscribing to the “if you can’t beat ‘em, join ‘em” school of thought, I set about creating a foyer that would capitalize on the room’s assets.

Sotropa residence photo, as referenced in Calgary interior design blog, The Pink Chandelier, by Calgary interior designer Reena Sotropa of Corea Sotropa Interior Design.Sotropa foyer, post-renovation.  Interior Design by Corea Sotropa Interior Design

You can see that opening up the room instantly improved the overall levels of natural light by stealing rays from the adjacent kitchen and bathroom. I wanted to create some drama in this space so I chose to paint the walls in Benjamin Moore’s HC-69 Whitall Brown. The combination of this rich grey-based chocolate with my old friend OC-130 Cloud White on the trim and ceiling serves to create that classic look I admire so much. The hardwood floors were ruined when we tore out the walls so instead of patching them, I ripped out the remaining hardwood and installed marble tile which runs seamlessly into the kitchen and bathroom.

One little problem I encountered when I decided to remove all the walls was that I no longer had a separation between the public (foyer) and private (bedrooms & bathroom) spaces. There was no way to fully rectify this issue short of building a wall, which I was not about to do. So, I resolved to drop the ceilings in the short halls that lead to the private spaces. In addition, I painted the dropped ceilings and the door trim in the wall colour to further minimize the spaces. Although this didn’t create a physical buffer, it does serve as a psychological cue, indicating that one is entering a private or intimate space.

I lit these little niches separately with recessed lighting, but chose the “Emma” pendant from Zia Priven for the ambient lighting in the foyer. Furnishing the foyer was pretty simple. I placed a 3′ diameter center table under the light and centered a huge mirror on the wall.  I pulled one of my extra dining room chairs into the corner so guests have a place to sit when they put on their shoes. To add further storage I had a small bench built across from the coat closet. We keep all of our scarves, hats and gloves in the concealed drawer below. I had a custom cushion made for the bench in ultra-leather and I tend to switch out the artwork and the pillows to change things up from time to time.

Sotropa foyer, as referenced in Calgary interior design blog, The Pink Chandelier, by Calgary interior designer Reena Sotropa of Corea Sotropa Interior Design.

Sotropa foyer, post renovation. Interior Design by Corea Sotropa Interior Design

That is how my lowly front entrance/hallway became a card-carrying member of the foyer club.  Below are a few other examples of foyers with the same rich chocolate brown and crisp white colour combination I chose.

The graphic zebra rugs in these two foyers pack a nice punch and help to ground these double-volume spaces.

Coco Cozy and Elle Decor images, as referenced in Calgary interior design blog, The Pink Chandelier, by Calgary interior designer Reena Sotropa of Corea Sotropa Interior Design.Left image courtesy of Coco Cozy, Interior design by Betsy Burnham.  Image on right via Elle Decor, Interior Design by Hortensia “Tense” Vitale

The designers of these foyers (below) also chose to  inject black & white with their graphic floor tile selections.

Decorpad and Chinoiserie Chic images, as referenced in Calgary interior design blog, The Pink Chandelier, by Calgary interior designer Reena Sotropa of Corea Sotropa Interior Design.Image at left from Decorpad, Interior Design by Phoebe Howard. Right image is courtesy of Chinoiserie Chic, Interior Design by Miles Redd.

Below are two examples of  a classic foyer furniture arrangement. A console table is a great opportunity for seasonal display.

Dear Ada and Markham Roberts images, as referenced in Calgary interior design blog, The Pink Chandelier, by Calgary interior designer Reena Sotropa of Corea Sotropa Interior Design.Image at left from Domino Magazine via Dear Ada. Interior Design by Mary Margaret Briggs. Image at right courtesy of Markham Roberts.

Oh, there’s nothing better than a hit of pink in a chocolate-coloured room. It puts one in the mood for Neapolitan ice cream, non?

House Beautiful and Anne Chovie images, as referenced in Calgary interior design blog, The Pink Chandelier, by Calgary interior designer Reena Sotropa of Corea Sotropa Interior Design.Left image via House Beautiful. Interior Design by Ned Marshall. Right image from Anne Chovie. Interior Design by Jan Showers.

Here are two examples of foyers using the same chocolate brown and white wallpaper. This works as well in the casual entry (right) as it does in the more formal entry shown on the left.

House Beautiful and House & Home images, as referenced in Calgary interior design blog, The Pink Chandelier, by Calgary interior designer Reena Sotropa of Corea Sotropa Interior Design.Image at left from House Beautiful. Interior Design by Tom Scheerer. Right image courtesy of House & Home. Interior Design by Sabrina Linn.

Below are two more examples of wallpaper in the foyer. What a fantastic way to set the tone for your home!

House & Home and Jeffers Design Group images, as referenced in Calgary interior design blog, The Pink Chandelier, by Calgary interior designer Reena Sotropa of Corea Sotropa Interior Design.House & Home image on left.  Interior Design by Timothy Mather. Image at right courtesy of Jeffers Design Group.

I will leave you with this one ray of hope. Our friend (Forthright) at Phrontistery conducted a poll on the usage of the word foyer and its pronunciation. He noted that a couple of poll respondents indicated that they were abandoning or had abandoned FOY-er after hearing FOY-yay or learning that it was ‘correct.’ So perhaps FOY-yay may not be simply an intermediate form on its way out, but may eventually replace the more fully anglicized FOY-er.

Well, one can only hope.

That’s my two cents!

Reena

* All photos and floorplans of Sotropa residence are property of Reena Sotropa and Corea Sotropa Interior Design.

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